Recipe: BBQ Shrimp (Portuguese Style)

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There’s nothing more delicious — and simple! — than shrimp on the BBQ. Traditional Portuguese-style calls for shrimp with the heads on. While it might be intimidating, the heads preserve a fantastic amount of flavor and add to the presentation of the dish.

  • 13/15 shrimp, shell on, preferably with the heads on.
  • Portuguese Malagueta (pimento paste)
  • Sambal Oelek (Indonesian hot sauce)
  • Olive oil
  • White wine
  • Fresh cilantro or parsley, roughly chopped
  1. Combine Malagueta, Sambal Oelek, olive oil and white wine in a stainless steel bowl. Reserve half the sauce to the side.
  2. Toss the thawed shrimp with the other half of the sauce and allow to sit for a 10 minutes at room temperature.
  3. Bring grill to med-high heat and throw shrimp onto the grill. In case of flame-ups, keep an open beer handy!
  4. Seafood cooks very quickly on the grill. You’ll only need a couple minutes per side. Once the shell changes color and the tails start to burn, pull the shrimp off into a clean bowl
  5. Toss with the remaining sauce
  6. Finish with the chopped cilantro or parsely
  7. Crack open a crisp lager and mangia!

Beer Pairing: Singha Lager or GLB’s Blonde Lager

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On Cooking

For me, food is tightly bound in memory, experience, culture and family. My greatest culinary influences are family members, and nearly every fond memory I have with them involves cooking. I do truly believe that great food is made with love; it’s not mechanical or scientific; great food, like memory and experience, is transcendent.

I am a man who likes to color outside of the lines, and so it should come as no surprise that I do not believe in following a recipe or measuring the ingredients that go into my creations. Cooking, for me, is stream of consciousness. Culinary schools and restaurants alike will often teach “consistency is key,” though I am not interested in cooking, or eating, for consistency. I want to be surprised and challenged; I want the risk, and the reward, that comes with cooking from the heart.

My recipes posts, as such, will not look like your conventional recipe book. I don’t outline quantities, weights or fluid ounces. I’ll often recommend substitutions for core ingredients. Many of the foods I make leverage left-overs from a previous recipe. In short, when it comes to cooking, I give a big, giant ‘fuck you’ to convention.

Enjoy and mangia!